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Sports Concussion Treatment 

A concussion is a serious type of traumatic brain injury caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head – or even a blow to the body that causes the head to jerk back and forth – that can change the way your brain normally works.

Concussions can occur in any sport or recreational activity and usually do not involve a loss of consciousness. In fact, what used to simply be called “getting your bell rung,” may sometimes actually be a sports-related concussion. That’s why it’s so vital that all coaches, parents and athletes learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of concussion in sports and what to do about it.

Baylor supports concussion treatment and management through a variety of educational and clinical services, including providing ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) for athletes. 

Find out more about concussions and their management at the links below or by contacting a local Baylor SportsCare representative

Concussion Symptoms & Signs

Concussion Symptoms & Signs 

Coaches or parents who notice any of the following signs – or if an athlete reports any concussion-like symptoms – should immediately remove the athlete from play and have him or her evaluated by a health care professional experienced in concussions.

Some athletes may not experience symptoms until hours or days after the injury. Most people will recover quickly and fully, but sometimes symptoms of concussion can last for days, weeks or longer.

Symptoms Observed by Others

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets an instruction
  • Is unsure of game, score or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows mood, behavior or personality changes
  • Can’t recall events prior to a hit or fall
  • Can’t recall events after a hit or fall

Symptoms Reported by Athlete

  • Headache or “pressure” in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems

Concussion Symptoms and Signs

Coaches or parents who notice any signs – or if an athlete reports any concussion-like symptoms – should immediately remove the athlete from play and have him or her evaluated by a health care professional experienced in concussions.

Learn More

If Concussion Is Suspected

If Concussion Is Suspected

Four Steps to Follow If Concussion Is Suspected

Follow these four steps if a possible concussion has occurred in an athlete:

  1. Immediately remove the athlete from play. Look for additional signs and symptoms of a concussion if the athlete has experienced a bump or blow to the head or body. When in doubt, keep the athlete out of play.
  2. Have the athlete checked by a health care professional experienced in evaluating concussions. Do not try to judge the severity of the injury yourself. Health care professionals have a number of methods that they can use to assess the severity of concussions. Providing the following information to the health care professional can help in assessing the athlete after the injury:
    • Cause of the injury and force of the hit or blow to the head or body
    • Any loss of consciousness (passed out/knocked out) and if so, for how long
    • Any memory loss immediately following the injury
    • Any seizures immediately following the injury
    • Number of previous concussions (if any)
  3. Inform the athlete’s parents or guardians and give them the fact sheet on concussion. Make sure they know that the athlete should be seen by a health care professional experienced in evaluating for concussion.
  4. Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury. The athlete should not return to play until a health care professional experienced in evaluating concussions clears them to return to play. A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first – usually within a short period of time (hours, days or weeks) – can slow recovery or increase the likelihood of having long-term problems. In rare cases, repeat concussions can result in edema (brain swelling), permanent brain damage and even death.

If Concussion Is Suspected

If a concussion in an athlete is suspected, there are four steps everyone should follow to help ensure the safety of the athlete and prompt treatment.

Learn More

Preventing & Managing Concussions

Preventing & Managing Concussions 

Preventing Concussions in Sports

While concussion is not totally preventable, there are steps coaches, parents and athletes can take to reduce the risk: 

  • Use the proper equipment every time and ensure that it is worn properly and fits correctly.
  • Follow the rules and safety guidelines for the sport.
  • Do not initiate contact with your head, even if you are wearing a helmet.
  • Never intentionally strike an opponent in the head.

Managing Concussions

Having a designated concussion management program is now a requirement for many schools, clubs and recreational leagues. These programs often include mandatory education/training for coaches, athletic trainers and other staff, as well as an established protocol if a concussion is suspected and returning to play. 
 
Baylor supports concussion treatment and management through a variety of educational and clinical services, including providing ImPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) for athletes.   

For additional information on sports-related concussion:

Concussion Prevention & Management

While concussions are not totally preventable, there are steps that can help reduce concussion risk. There are also various educational and clinical services to help manage a concussion should one occur.

Learn More